Saturday, November 22, 2014

A BIG BURLEY CROP HEADS TO MARKET

Burley curing in a large open-sided barn near Lafayette, Tn.
Too much burley? Jerry Rankin, owner of Farmers Warehouse in Danville, Ky., is worried about the supply/demand situation, "Before the bad weather at the end of the season, we were looking at maybe 28 million pounds of burley with no home. Now, because of the weather, it looks like more like 18 to 20 million pounds, but that is still enough that prices may not be too good." The Farmers Warehouse Tobacco will openTuesday before Thanksgiving at 9:30 a.m., and most others will open that week or soon after.



Good season, bad end: Rankin says Central Kentucky had a very good crop for most of the season until weather problems occurred late. "The season ended really bad. We had two weeks when rain fell nearly every day. It was too much, and the tobacco in field suffered." It was a common sight to see leaves falling from some stalks. "The frost hit while a lot of tobacco was on the stick, wilting," he says. "I saw some farmers pulling out their sticks and leaving the tobacco. Very little that was produced after the first week of October will be a quality that anyone will want."     


Higher yield needed: Larry Thompson of Bagdad, Ky., between Louisville and Lexington, says perhaps 10 percent of the local crop was still in the field when the weather turned cold. He doesn't know whether any of it will be usable. Fortunately for him, he'd gotten all his burley cut by the end of September. Stripping of his 50-acre crop is about a third finished now. His traditional varieties seem to be declining in yield, and he thinks a new high-yielding variety, HB 4488, could play a bigger part on this farm as a result. He wound up with some overage beyond his two contracts. At this point, it looks like he may not average more than $1.30 a pound on it. "That is a big comedown from $2 a pound last year," he says.

Disappointing sales in N.C.: Brent Ward of Elk Park, N.C., grew two acres this year of burley and sold some of it on November 11 at the Old Belt Warehouse in Rural Hall, N.C. The highest sold for $1.30 a pound. Some of it sold for $1.10. Ironically, this was some good tobacco. "Last year, I got a 2,000-pound yield on it. This year the weather was a little better and I should be over that. I am hoping for 4,500 pounds for the two acres." The new KT 212 variety did well for him and he will use it again if he grows tobacco again. "I would like to put out tobacco next year but not if I am going to lose money on it."

New chemical for black shank: Valent is likely to get a label for Presidio on tobacco early in 2015. It reportedly has good efficacy on black shank. It will be important to rotate it with other chemicals to prevent resistance, Extension specialists say. 

Lucky Strike stack still smoking: The Commonwealth Brands cigarette factory in Reidsville, N.C.--famous for its Lucky Strike smokestack--will continue to operate after its parent company, UK-based Imperial Tobacco Group, acquires the Lorillard Tobacco manufacturing, R&D facilities, corporate headquarters buildings and some 2,900 employees in Greensboro, N.C. Commonwealth-Altadis, Inc., which was formed in 2010 by Imperial Tobacco by combining Commonwealth Brands and cigar maker Altadis USA and is headquartered in Fort Lauderdale, Fl., also will become part of Imperial's new American entity, ITG Brands. All of this is dependent on regulatory approval,which is expected this coming spring, but if all goes as planned, Imperial will acquire Reynolds American's Kool, Salem and Winston cigarette brands and Lorillard's blu eCigs and Maverick cigarette brands. (It has been speculated that Reynolds American's Doral cigarette may also wind up in Imperial's hands.) Also part of the deal: Lorillard's tobacco receiving and storage facilities in Danville, Va. Blu eCigs will continue to be based in Charlotte. Commonwealth-Altadis' brands include USA Gold, Montclair and Sonoma cigarettes, and Dutch Masters, Backwoods and Phillies cigars.

UPCOMING GAP RECERTIFICATION MEETINGS


 
NORTH CAROLINA (Flue-cured)  
  • January 13, 10 a.m. Martin County Farmers Market, 4001 Main Street, Williamston, N.C. Contact: 257-789-4370 or al_cochranncsu.edu.
ADVERTISING




TMI
BIG M TOBACCO WAREHOUSE 
1723 Goldsboro St. SW, Wilson, N.C., 
in the old Liberty Warehouse

Greg Goins is the auctioneer at Big M Warehouse.
We will hold both sealed bid auctions
and live auctions. 
We promise 
HONEST AND TRUSTWORTHY 
SERVICE
We will be GAP certified 
For more information, contact Mann Mullen at 919-496-9033 
or the warehouse switchboard at 252-206-1447.





FARMERS TOBACCO WAREHOUSE
 209 Harding St., Danville, Ky.

Full-service burley warehouse

Jerry Rankin, Owner


 Opening Tuesday, November 25 at 9:30 a.m. Call for information.

Tytun rated 1

TOBACCO BARN SALE DECEMBER 6

Thursday, November 6, 2014

LITTLE LEAF LEFT IN FIELD AFTER INTENSE WEEKEND COLD

Burley cure
Getting burley cured any way you can: Burley hangs in black plastic-covered outdoor curing structures at the Highland Rim Research Center in Springfield, Tn. Burley was also hanging in the conventional barns in the left background.

BURLEY
  • Kentucky--A freeze over the weekend over much of the burley-producing area essentially brought the growing season to a halt. "There were still a few fields that hadn't been harvested," said Bob Pearce, Kentucky Extension tobacco specialist. "But I don't expect much of that to be harvested now." Curing conditions had been good, and some is being stripped. "There is some good tobacco now, but I expect a big range of quality between the beginning of the season and the end," Pearce said. He hesitates to estimate production but thinks the current USDA estimate of 160.6 million pounds is too high. "This has been a tough crop to get a handle on," he said.
  • Tennessee--The cold weather reached Tennessee a day sooner, but very little tobacco remained in the field there either. In Macon County, the number one burley county in the state, Extension agent Steve Walker said, "We had a major freeze over the weekend. It got to 25 degrees here in Lafayette and was colder  north to theLong Eagle Barns  Kentucky border. It froze all that was still out. Some are trying to harvest what was left, but I think they would get poor quality with some color. It might not cure up at all"... Harvest had been brought to a near halt in north central Tennessee a few weeks earlier by a week of rain. "We had been dry after some showers around Labor Day, but then there was heavy rain from October 8 to October 16," said George Marks of Clarksville. "We had eight inches in six days" ... East Tennessee had its earliest measurable snowfall since 1925, said USDA.
  • Southwest Virginia/West N.C.-- In southwestern Virginia's Carroll County, higher elevations received two to three inches of snow Friday night to Saturday morning, with temperatures well down into in the 20s, said the county agent there...And in Yancey County, N.C., temperatures dropped into the 20's and the first snow of the season fell....Kenneth Reynolds of Abingdon, Va., had finished cutting and hanging his burley before the cold snap. "The wet weather may affect the quality. It is a big crop, but I am afraid it will be thin because of all the rain," he said. What he has stripped so far has appeared average. "All the rain brought the tobacco in case (so he could work it). But we need some dry weather to dry out the leaf."
FLUE-CURED
  • Virginia--For all practical purposes, flue-cured harvest was over as of Monday, said David Reed, Virginia Extension tobacco specialist. "Only a few growers here and there still had tobacco in the field at the end of last week," he said. "It was generally small amounts, maybe a half dozen to a dozen barns per farmer." Because of the scattered frost over the weekend, he doesn't know if much of that will be harvested or not. Barely adequate barn space was the main reason harvest continued so late. "We had just so much curing capacity," Reed says.
  • North Carolina--Most of the flue-cured-producing area in the state got scattered frost Sunday, said Matthew Vann, N.C. Extension tobacco specialist. Some areas got only a light frost, and some areas escaped it completely. There was still a little flue-cured left in the field, especially in the Piedmont. "If you just had a light frost, you might be able to harvest and sell it. But after a freeze, the leaf turns black, and there is no need of harvesting it"...Harvesting was intense the last week of October. "A few tobacco farmers (in our county) used neighbors' barns to get their remaining tobacco in before the predicted frost," said Brian Parrish, Harnett County Extension tobacco agent in a USDA survey.
In other tobacco news:
PMI will let dealers do its buying: Philip Morris International (PMI) announced November 5 that it will cease contracting directly with American farmers beginning with the 2015 crop. Instead, it will purchase American leaf exclusively through Alliance One International (AOI) and Universal Corporation. The two dealers will honor any multiyear farmer contracts still outstanding, PMI said. What happens to PMI receiving stations? I have been told that AOI intends to operate at least two of PMI's existing receiving stations--Kernersville, N.C., and Smithfield, N.C. I contacted a friend who manages one of PMI's burley stations yesterday--he said the news had come as a surprise to him and his co-workers, and they have no idea if they will still be working after the new agreement goes into effect. Why the change? Thee may be some efficiencies to be obtained. My guess is that PMI has been having problems moving grades it doesn't really need. This way, it can let the two dealers handle this tobacco. Maybe PMI doesn't feel it has the expertise to deal with the child labor question, or just doesn't want to. The details of complying with the GAP program may have been problematic for PMI too, it's been suggested. Well, look for more on this development in the next issue.
Flue-cured auctions still going strong: The Big M Warehouse in Wilson, N.C. (phone  919 496 9033), will probably continue sealed bid auctions until November 19 or 20. Piedmont Warehouse in Danville, Va. (phone 434-203-1404), will continue its sealed bid auctions until November 21 or perhaps a bit later. The Carolinas Tobacco Auction in Lake City, S.C., tentatively plans a final sale on November 13 (call 843-687-5753 for details). The Old Belt Tobacco live auction in Rural Hall, N.C. (phone 336 416 6262) will sell flue-cured through most of November, then switch to burley and sell till perhaps mid December. Volume has been good lately, with B grades selling in the $1.75 to $1.80 a pound range. Watch for news on burley auctions in conventional markets in future issues.

If you haven't signed on to receive it regularly or need to change an address, please click on "Join our mailing list" and follow the prompts. For more information, you can call me at919-789-4631 or email me at chrisbickers@gmail.com. Thanks--Chris Bickers

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ADVERTISING


TMI

BIG M TOBACCO WAREHOUSE 
1723 Goldsboro St. SW, Wilson, N.C., 
in the old Liberty Warehouse
Greg Goins is the auctioneer at Big M Warehouse.
We will hold both sealed bid auctions
and live auctions. 
We promise 
HONEST AND TRUSTWORTHY 
SERVICE
We will be GAP certified 
For more information, contact Mann Mullen at 919-496-9033 
or the warehouse switchboard at 252-206-1447.


 

Tytun rated 1

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Burley wilting
Late burley: In Macon County, Tn., near Nashville this just-cut burley was wilting last Wednesday afternoon. The growers hoped to hang it in curing barns soon after this picture was taken.
WILL THE  2014  CROP 
EVER GET HARVESTED?

Green
Daniel Green

There was definitely still burley in the field when growers gathered in Springfield, Tn., last Tuesday for the annual meeting of Burley Stabilization Corporation (BSC). The reasons were much the same as those affecting the Eastern and Old Belt flue-cured crops: Excessive rain late in the season had delayed harvest, and excessive production will be a problem to market. "It appears the burley crop will be about 205 million pounds, but the demand is only estimated at 185 millions pounds," said Daniel Green, BSC chief operating officer. "We may have 20 million pounds of excess tobacco." Finding a market is going to be the problem for some farmers. "Some have reportedly found some alternative markets, and BSC will try to help by buying some extra, but that will have to be a limited amount." The bottom line: Green fears that some late tobacco and non-contract tobacco may go at a lower price.

One bright spot, but not very bright: There has been a lack in recent crops of low quality grades of burley popular with value customers, many of whom have had to turn to overseas sources, said Green. "Some demand has gone unfulfilled. There may well be significant leaf of this type in this crop, and there is a demand for it." But the price for this is not likely to be high. 
Walker
Eric Walker

Perhaps 10 percent of the Tennessee burley crop remained in the field as of Monday of this week, said Tennessee Extension specialist Eric Walker. No doubt it is considerably less than that now, four days later--most of the state's burley areas had good harvesting weather the past week, and farmers were cutting and hanging to beat all. "What I have seen looks good," says Walker. "I think it will be an average crop"...Walker, who took the Extension specialist position earlier this year, was attending the BSC meeting for the first time. He is stationed at the Highland Rim Research Center. That is quite a break from tradition--Tennessee's burley specialist has traditionally worked out of an office at the Knoxville campus of the University of Tennessee...But the recent tradition of cooperation with Kentucky tobacco Extension will continue. Walker will spend about 25 percent of his time in Kentucky working on Extension activities, 50 percent in Tennessee on Extension activities and 25 percent on Tennessee research. University of Tennessee plant science research associate Joe Beeler will help as needed in Knoxville.
Old Belt 
The flue-cured crop in North Carolina and Virginia still hasn't been completely harvested, especially in the Piedmont. At the N.C. State Fair on October 17, state agricultural commissioner Steve Troxler joked that if there isn't a killing frost in his home county of Guilford (near Greensboro), the farmers might not finish harvesting till Thanksgiving Day! Over in Oxford, N.C., also in the Piedmont, Pat Short of the N.C. Department of Agriculture said the crop at the tobacco research station is not quite that late. But harvest isn't done. "We need about two more weeks (i.e., to the end of October). We hope it doesn't frost before then." 

The USDA October production estimate, with percentage comparison to 2013:
  • Flue-cured: Total--557.4 million pounds, up 22.6 percent. North Carolina--434.4 million pounds, up 20.6 percent; Virginia--55 million pounds, up 16.2 percent; Georgia--35 million pounds, up 56.2 percent; South Carolina--33 million pounds, up 34.1 percent.
  • Burley: Total--211.4 million pounds, up 9.8 percent. Kentucky--160,600 million pounds, up 8.5 percent; Tennessee--25.2 million pounds, 24.1 percent; Pennsylvania--12.4 million pounds, up 2.4 percent; Virginia--5.3 million pounds, up 17.8 percent; Ohio--4.4 million pounds, down four percent; North Carolina--3.4 million pounds, up 28.5 percent.
  • Other types: Fire-cured--50.5 million pounds, up three percent. Dark air-cured--14.9 million pounds, up eight percent. Cigar types--9.7 million pounds, up 23.1 percent. Southern Maryland (Pennsylvania), 4.7 million pounds, no change.
ADVERTISING

TMI
BIG M TOBACCO WAREHOUSE 
1723 Goldsboro St. SW, Wilson, N.C., 
in the old Liberty Warehouse
Greg Goins is the auctioneer at Big M Warehouse.
We will hold both sealed bid auctions
and live auctions. 
We promise 
HONEST AND TRUSTWORTHY 
SERVICE
We will be GAP certified 
For more information, contact Mann Mullen at 919-496-9033 
or the warehouse switchboard at 252-206-1447.



 

Tytun rated 1

Thursday, October 9, 2014

WILL ENOUGH FLUE-CURED BE TOO MUCH?

Harvesting flue-cured
Workers gather leaf in a flue-cured field on Marty Adams' farm east of Raleigh. Adams hoped to wrap up this long harvest season by October 15.

The size of the flue-cured crop in eastern North Carolina will apparently remain a mystery right up until end of harvest. In recent weeks, there continued to be reports of weather-related losses:
  • Marty Adams and his son M.J. grow flue-cured in the Knightdale area just east of Raleigh. At mid season, they had what was clearly their best crop ever. But the rain turned it yellow and washed out much of the weight. Harvest was considerably delayed; Marty expects to finish around the 15th, which is about when he starts looking for first frost. And the ground stayed so wet that he had to park his mechanical harvester and finish the crop by hand.
  • Kevin Gardner of Macclesfield, N.C., said his family had finished harvest on his farm around October 1. It was a big crop in the field, but the rain washed it out and it didn't weigh good. "I think our yield will be about average," says Gardner.
  • Harvest ended in mid September for Johnny McLawhorn of Hookerton, N.C. "It was just a fair crop [thanks to the rain]," he says. "We produced about 85 percent of what we expected."
Even if eastern N.C. doesn't produce an enormous crop, my sources say there is already more flue-cured out there than the market wants. The Old Belt seems headed for a big crop too, but it is even later than the Eastern Belt, and much of the latest leaf may have to be abandoned. So how much flue-cured will be produced? The leaf man I respect most in this business told me off the record last Friday that he thinks now that flue-cured production of 525 million pounds is probably a reasonable projection. On the demand side, he thinks that 490 million pounds will be as much as contracting manufacturers will take. "The remaining 35 million or so pounds will probably be taken to auctions," he says. Long Eagle Barn

Sales will continue at least through November 15 at the Big M auction warehouse in Wilson, N.C, says owner Mann Mullen. In recent sales, lugs at his auctions have been bringing in the $1 to $1.10 a pound range, cutters $1.40 to $1.50 a pound and leaf $1.70 to $1.80 a pound. "Most have been satisfied with what they are getting," Mullen says.




Auctions in the Old Belt will likely continue at Rural  Hall, N.C., till the end of November, if not later, says Old Belt Ware-house owner Dennis White. Prices have improved substantially since the opening sale. "We sold 425,000 pounds last Tuesday at an average of about $1.32 a pound," says White. "Far fewer bids were rejected than at our opening sale." Very little leaf grade tobacco has been brought to the warehouse yet. What has come in sold in the $1.80 a pound range. Cutters have brought $1.60.

Not halfway through the auction season? "I don't think we are a third done," White says. "A lot of the Piedmont crop has still been pulled just once. It is big tobacco and just now starting to 'break.' If the frost holds off, it will be a very big crop."

A full-scale burley auction in the Old Belt: White says he has gotten many calls from burley growers seeking an auction. "If the interest stands up, I plan to start selling burley the third or fourth week of October," he says. "I will do it on the same days that I sell flue-cured." But not at the same time. He will sell the flue-cured, then sell the burley, he says. 

Editor's note: As you probably noticed, I managed to commit not one but two typographical errors in one sentence in my September II issue, which had the effect of making my source seem uncharacteristically indecisive. Here is how it should have read--"A lot of flue-cured is deteriorating on the stalk in Eastern N.C., says Matthew Vann, N.C. Extension tobacco specialist, who continues to think that the barn-busting crop predicted six weeks ago is unlikely to occur."

Burley cut and curing: Tim Ware of Belwood, N.C., had cut all his burley around September 1. It is curing now and looks like a better crop than last year, he says. Ware farms near the point where the N.C. mountains end and the N.C. Piedmont begins, and he didn't get excess rain at any time during the growing season. In fact, he had a dry spell after he planted in mid May and is glad now he irrigated twice in that period. "I think the irrigation really helped get it over the hump." Ware got into burley after deregulation. He cures in outdoor curing structures even though he has some barn space that he could use. "I find it more labor efficient to use the outdoor structures," he says.

Harvest nearly over in Tennessee: At least 80 percent and probably more than 90 percent of the burley crop has been cut in Tennessee, says Extension specialist Eric Walker. "It might have been farther along except for some labor problems we had, especially in the eastern part of the state." Once the season passed the mid point, there weren't many problems. He doesn't have a production estimate yet but the state yield should be at least average.

Grower associations disavow child labor: Two organizations of tobacco farmers have recently taken a stand against the hiring of non-family youngsters to work tobacco, which has become quite a controversial issue of late. But it is a non-issue to most flue-cured growers today, said Tim Yarbrough, farmer president of the Tobacco Growers Association of North Carolina (TGANC). "The modern tobacco operations in our state today find it difficult to rely on such labor anyway. The use of more mechanization and extended growing season means there is increasingly less for kids to do like there was 25 years ago." Resolutions of TGANC and the Council for Burley Tobacco follow (excerpted).

What the North Carolinians resolved: While we do not believe that tobacco fields are inherently unsafe for qualified persons who receive proper training and personal protective equipment, we recognize that there are particular risks associated with working in tobacco. Accordingly, the TGANC adopts the following policy:
  • TGANC does not condone the use of child labor.
  • Tobacco growers and farm labor contractors should not employ workers younger than 16 years of age for work in tobacco, even with parental permission and including instances where the parent's request the work for them.
  • Tobacco growers and farm labor contractors should be cautious about employing 16- and 17-year-old workers in tobacco even though the U.S. Fair Labor Standards Act allows it. If growers elect to employ 16- and 17-year-olds, it is encouraged that the employee provide express written parental permission. The farmer must provide appropriate safety training and personal protective equipment to perform only non-hazardous tasks.
  • Children of the family farm represent a unique circumstance in regards to child labor. Their engagement or related activities in a family farming perspective is a lifestyle for them as opposed to a vocation. Passing down strong agricultural values to the next generation is a key to ensuring productive and successful farms for the future. Therefore, this policy does not apply to members of a grower's family who work or otherwise perform various tasks on their farms because of direct and specific parental supervision.
What the Council for Burley Tobacco resolved:
  • We do not condone the hiring of anyone under the age of 16 for work in tobacco anywhere in the world. 
  • Burley farmers in the United States understand the dangers burley production jobs pose to children and [believe] the incidence of children working in tobacco production is low in this country."

ADVERTISING

TMI

BIG M TOBACCO WAREHOUSE 
1723 Goldsboro St. SW, Wilson, N.C., 
in the old Liberty Warehouse
Greg Goins is the auctioneer at Big M Warehouse.
We will hold both sealed bid auctions
and live auctions. 
We promise 
HONEST AND TRUSTWORTHY 
SERVICE
We will be GAP certified 
For more information, contact Mann Mullen at 919-496-9033 
or the warehouse switchboard at 252-206-1447.


 

Tytun rated 1

Saturday, September 20, 2014

PROSPECTS DIMINISH FOR A PRICE-DEPRESSING SURPLUS

Harvest
Workers gather leaf from a flue-cured field near Winston-Salem, N.C.
FLUE-CURED

A lot of flue-cured is deteriorating on the stalk in Eastern North Carolina, says Matthew Vann, N.C. Extension tobacco specialist, who continues to think that the barn-busting crop predicted six weeks ago is unlikely to occur. "Some tobacco-growing areas in the East have gotten as much rain as last year at this time," he says. "It was hot one week this month and rainy the next, and now the crop is going back fast." Some growers are finishing harvest now. "Farmers are really putting the accelerator down, with emphasis on quality. I am seeing some pale color. I wouldn't expect much green leaf that won't cure, at least not in the East."

In the N.C. Piedmont, the situation is the exact opposite, says Vann. "There was a prolonged dry period and late-season uptake fertilizer. Now, growers are going to hard pressed to complete harvest before first frost." Tim Yarbrough, a farmer in Prospect Hill, N.C. (near Roxboro), says, "It will be very hard to get the last of this crop harvested and cured. It is not just the shortage of barns. Farmers will have a hard time getting into the field with enough machinery and labor to get the job done. There are just so many hours in the day." 

In Virginia, Halifax County Extension agent Chris Brown says the flue-cured there is definitely late. "It is hard to put a finger on how much has been harvested, but it seems likely at this point that frost will nip some of what is left. If we have an early frost, we could have a big problem. Some farmers are not half way up the stalk yet." So far, the quality appears decent. Some stalk-cut tobacco is grown in Halifax County, he says, and most had been cut by mid-September. "Both the burley (45 acres) and dark fire cured (15 acres) look good," he says. "In fact, the dark looks real good."

BURLEY

In Kentucky, harvest was perhaps 60 percent done by the middle of this week. "We are way behind," says Bob Pearce, Kentucky Extension tobacco specialist. "We have had a problem with rain--it stays so wet that you can't do anything. There has been some hollow stalk rot and some leaf drop, and some farmers may not have all their tobacco cut before first frost." Labor has been an issue for some growers, he says. On the bright side, Pearce is optimistic about the quality.

In western N.C., dry weather has contributed to a relatively late burley crop. A shortage of labor has further delayed harvest. One farmer near Asheville had a field that was ready to cut before his labor crew arrived. So he used a tractor-mounted sickle mower to cut down the stalks two rows at a time. It took some experimentation to find the right speed, but the farmer says the results were good and cutting one acre took less than an hour. "There was some damage, but there would have been more if I'd let it go any longer." Still, he hopes the rest of his fields will hold till his crew arrives so he can cut conventionally.

How to save labor in burley harvest: At the Upper Piedmont Research Station at Reidsville, N.C., researchers use a Weedeater with a blade to cut the stalk as they walk backward down the row. "You can cut burley much faster with the Weedeater than with a tobacco knife, and you don't have to bend over to do it," says Joe French, superintendent at the station. "Breakage might be a concern, since the stalk falls straight down. But we haven't had enough breakage yet for it to be a problem." Besides the Weedeater, the station staff has increased its labor savings by notching the stalk and hanging it from wire rather than spearing it on sticks. For more information about this approach, you can call the station at 336 349 8347.

USDA September estimate of production
With percentage comparison to 2013

Flue-cured: US--537.8 million lbs, up 18%. Individual states: NC--416.3 million lbs, up 15%; Virginia--55 million lbs, up 16%; Georgia--35 million lbs, up 56%; SC--31.5 million lbs, up 28%. Burley: US--211.7 million lbs, up 10%. Individual states:Kentucky--160.6 million lbs, up 8%; Tennessee--25.2 million lbs, up 24%; Pennsylvania--12.7 million lbs, up 4%; Virginia--5.3 million lbs, up 17%; Ohio--4.4 million lbs, down 4%; NC--3.4 million lbs, up 30%. Other types: Fire-cured: 50.5 million lbs, no change. Dark fire-cured: 14.9 million lbs, up 6%. Cigar types: 9.5 million lbs, up 34%. Southern Maryland: 4.6 million lbs, up 2%
__________________________________________________
 

Tytun rated 1

Old Belt Tobacco Sales

TMI

Long


BIG M TOBACCO WAREHOUSE 

1723 Goldsboro St. SW, Wilson, N.C., 
in the old Liberty Warehouse
Greg Goins is the auctioneer at Big M Warehouse.
We will hold both sealed bid auctions

and live auctions. 
We promise 
HONEST AND TRUSTWORTHY 

SERVICE
We will be GAP certified 

For more information, contact Mann Mullen at 919-496-9033 
or the warehouse switchboard at 252-206-1447.